Where Did You Go, Hezekiah Moscow? (Part III: Some Final Thoughts)

This is the third and final chapter of Ching Hook / Ching Ghook / Hezekiah Moscow’s story. You can read the first part (which includes information about why I’m researching him and what on earth all the name variations are about) here and the second part here. There has been a relatively huge amount of interest… Read More Where Did You Go, Hezekiah Moscow? (Part III: Some Final Thoughts)

Where Did You Go, Hezekiah Moscow? The Life and Times of Ching Hook (Part II: 1888-96)

This is the second chapter of Ching Hook / Ching Ghook / Hezekiah Moscow’s story. You can read the first part (which includes information about why I’m researching him and what on earth all the name variations are about) here. The year 1888 started well for Ching Hook, with a week-long residency at the Sebright… Read More Where Did You Go, Hezekiah Moscow? The Life and Times of Ching Hook (Part II: 1888-96)

Where Did You Go, Hezekiah Moscow? The Life and Times of Ching Hook (Part I: 1882-87)

Search the internet for “Victorian boxers”, “British boxers 1800s”, or any of the related phrases comprising 90 per cent of my Googling history, and you will probably – hopefully – come across this photograph: It is held by the UK National Archives alongside pictures of boxers Toff Wall and Bill Hook (no relation), with all… Read More Where Did You Go, Hezekiah Moscow? The Life and Times of Ching Hook (Part I: 1882-87)

WANNOP: EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW! A guest post by Walter ‘The Cross-Buttocker’ Armstrong

Good afternoon. The Cross-Buttocker here. Your usual Grappling With History blogger, Sarah, will be fully occupied over the next few weeks with her day job and a lengthy Masters Degree assignment on the Bosnian War, which of course I know little about, having died as I did in 1917 etc. while another large international skirmish… Read More WANNOP: EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW! A guest post by Walter ‘The Cross-Buttocker’ Armstrong

Resolute as a lion, cool as the regulation cucumber, Jack Wannop bids farewell to New Cross and hello to the Chicago Strangler

On Wednesday 15 February 1888 Jack Wannop said goodbye to Miriam and their clutch of small children and left his home at 105 Woodpecker Road, New Cross, London, for Euston and the midday train to Liverpool. Met with a cordial reception at Lime Street station by a Mr Snell, The Sporting Life reported that Jack… Read More Resolute as a lion, cool as the regulation cucumber, Jack Wannop bids farewell to New Cross and hello to the Chicago Strangler